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  • Results 1 to 4 of 4
    1. #1
      Senior Member
      The trouble with having an
      open mind, of course, is that
      people will insist on coming
      along and trying to put things
      in it. - Terry Pratchett
       
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      Galrion's Avatar
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      Ocean at the End of the Lane


      Gotta say, this is likely one of my favorite stories of all time. Neil Gaiman is at his best telling this tale. The best way to describe it? A bedtime story for adults. It's only 178 pages long, and that realization goes hand in hand with what it will make you do: stay awake until you finish the story.

      If you ever see it at the book store I highly recommend it to you. You won't be disappointed.

      Here's the synopsis from the books jacket:

      Sussex, England. A middle-aged man returns to his childhood home to attend a funeral. Although the house he lived in is long gone, he is drawn to the farm at the end of the road, where, when he was seven, he encountered a most remarkable girl, Lettie Hempstock, and her mother and grandmother. He hasn't thought of Lettie in decades, and yet as he sits by the pond (a pond that she'd claimed was an ocean) behind the ramshackle old farmhouse, the unremembered past comes flooding back. And it is a past too strange, too frightening, too dangerous to have happened to anyone, let alone a small boy.

      Forty years earlier, a man committed suicide in a stolen car at this farm at the end of the road. Like a fuse on a firework, his death lit a touchpaper and resonated in unimaginable ways. The darkness was unleashed, something scary and thoroughly incomprehensible to a little boy. And Lettie—magical, comforting, wise beyond her years—promised to protect him, no matter what.
      Happy reading!

    2. #2
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      Starforged's Avatar
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      Certainly sounds interesting indeed. May I ask how it compares with American Gods?

    3. #3
      Senior Member
      The trouble with having an
      open mind, of course, is that
      people will insist on coming
      along and trying to put things
      in it. - Terry Pratchett
       
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      Galrion's Avatar
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      I have not read American Gods yet, but what this work makes me think of most is Gaiman's short story compilations. It is quite abstract in that it doesn't really sit in the mold that you would normally consider to be a novel.

      A word of caution though, I have seen lackluster reviews from people going into this book expecting something like Anansi Boys or American Gods. So, if you decide to pick it up, keep in mind it will not be the same experience.

    4. #4
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      I've read this book based on Galrion's recommendation and definitely agree that it's worth it. It's really hard to describe. I would say it's party fantasy, part horror and all of it told through a child's unique perspective of the world. The surreal elements almost only make sense when tempered by the childish imagination of the protagonist.

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